The QLT Rubric

A Comprehensive Rubric for Enhancing Quality

At the core of the initiative is the QLT evaluation instrument containing 10 sections and 57 objectives. The evaluation instrument was developed after review of related research and literature (see below), as well as careful consideration of existing models for assessing effective teaching and learning.10 Sections of the QOLT evaluation instrument

QLT Basis in Research & Literature

The Quality Learning and Teaching (QLT) initiative was launched in 2011 by California State University. QLT is a compilation of research and learning and teaching best practices that provide opportunities to improve course design and delivery through self and peer review. As a QLT campus, SFSU has a variety of faculty development opportunities and resources dedicated to supporting the success of all our learners. Though the QLT Rubric was designed for blended and online courses, these best practices apply across all course formats, including the face-to-face classroom. The QLT Rubric offers a method for applying these research-based learning and teaching practices across any course format.

QLT was developed from various research and literature including:

Rubric for Online Instruction: Developed by CSU Chico in 2003 (Designed to assist development and evaluation of online courses while promoting dialog about the nature of student learning. ROI is now adopted at over 100 institutions of higher education)

Quality Matters: A faculty-centered, peer-review process to certify quality of online/blended courses. Universities all over the world subscribe to QM standards/processes.

Quality Online Course Initiative: An online course rubric and evaluation system developed in the state of Illinois to help colleges and universities improve accountability of their online courses.

Universal Design for Learning: Developed through a US Department of Education grant, Ensuring Access through Collaboration and Technology, based at Sonoma State University.

Community of Inquiry: This model addresses course quality on three aspects including Social Presence, Teaching Presence, and Cognitive Presence.

QLT was also shaped by research related to effective teaching and learning, such as "Seven Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education" (Chickering & Gamson, 1987)

 

To learn more about SFSU’s QLT Program and the ongoing faculty development opportunities, please contact iteach@sfsu.edu